Archive Monthly Archives: May 2017

Discussing the Weather in Spanish

Discussing the Weather in Spanish

Talking about the weather is a common pastime. Learn how discussing the weather in Spanish can not only help you pass the time with your Spanish speaking friends and acquaintances, but also how it can help you prepare for the day when visiting Spanish speaking countries!

Examples of Discussing the Weather in Spanish

​Asking about the weather:

1. ¿Cómo está el clima? OR ¿Cómo está el tiempo? - How is the weather?
2. ¿Qué tiempo hace? - What's the weather like?
3. ¿Cómo está el clima/tiempo en (name of city)? - How is the weather in (city)?

How to respond using hace:

1. Hace calor - It's hot
2. Hace frío - It's cold
3. Hace fresco - It's brisk/cool
4. Hace sol - It's sunny
5. Hace viento - It's windy
6. Hace buen/mal tiempo - The weather is good/bad

​How to respond using hay:

1. Hay humedad - It's humid
2. Hay nubes - It's cloudy
3. Hay niebla - It's foggy
4. Hay lluvia - It's raining

​How to respond using está:

1. Está lluvioso - It's raining
2. Está nublado - It's cloudy
3. Está oscuro - It's dark

Single Verb Responses:

In addition to using hace, hay, and está, sometimes you can easily use a single verb to describe the current weather, such as using llueve to say 'it's raining,' or nieva for 'it's snowing.' And for more information on weather expressions in Spanish, check out this link for a comprehensive guide.

Tiempo for Time and for Discussing the Weather in Spanish

Finally, talking about the weather in Spanish usually prompts the question, 'How do you know when tiempo means time versus weather?' ¿Cómo está el tiempo? and ¿Qué tiempo hace? will always mean 'How is the weather?' And '¿Qué hora es?' will always mean 'What time is it?' Otherwise, use context clues. For example, 'Tenemos mucho tiempo antes de la fiesta' probably means 'We have a lot of time before the party,' rather than 'We have a lot of weather before the party.' However, if you said 'Tenemos mucho tiempo acá en Seattle,' then you might be talking about having a lot of weather (rain), or having a lot of time to spend in that city if you are on vacation. Additionally, if that sentence was followed by 'Me gusta la lluvia,' then you would know that the original use of tiempo was in reference to weather!

Thank you!

We appreciate you taking a moment to read over this blog and watch the video above. Please submit any Spanish related questions you have in the comments below, and be sure to check out the other free resources on our site. ¡Muchas gracias!

Discussing Where You are From in Spanish

Discussing Where You are From in Spanish

How do Spanish speakers tell others where they are from? How do they ask someone else where they are from? How do we differentiate between state, city, and country when discussing where you are from in Spanish?

Examples of Discussing Where You are From in Spanish

Asking where someone is from informally and answering with a particular state in the US:
¿De dónde eres? - Where are you from (informal)?
Specific Example: Soy de Nueva York - I am from New York
Soy de (name of state in the US)- I'm from (name of state in the US)
OR Soy del estado de Nebraska - I am from the state of Nebraska

Asking where someone is from informally and answering with a particular city:
¿De dónde eres? - Where are you from (informal)?
Specific Example: Soy de la ciudad de Nueva York - I am from the city of New York (New York City)
Soy de la ciudad de (name of city) - I am from the city of (name of city)

Asking where someone is from informally and responding with a particular country:
¿De dónde eres? - Where are you from (informal)?
Specific Example: Soy de los Estados Unidos - I am from the United States
Soy de (name of country) - I'm from (name of country)
Specific Example: Soy del país de Cuba - I am from the country of Cuba

Other Expressions Related to Where Someone is From

Asking where someone is from formally:
¿De dónde es usted? - Where are you from (formal)?

Other ways to ask where someone is from (informally):
¿De cuál ciudad eres? - Which city are you from?
¿De cuál país eres? What country are you from?

Asking where he or she is from:
¿De dónde es? - Where is he/she from?
Él es de (name of city, country, or state) - He is from (name of city, country, or state)
Ella es de (name of city, country, or state) = She is from (name of city, country, or state)
(Name) es de (name of city, country, or state) - (Name)  is from (city, country, or state)


Did you know that some countries names change spelling and pronunciation in Spanish? Here's a complete list of country names in Spanish!

We appreciate you taking a moment to read over this blog and watch the video above. Please submit any Spanish related questions you have in the comments below, and be sure to check out the other free resources on our site. ¡Muchas gracias!

Discussing Likes and Dislikes

Discussing Likes and Dislikes

We've all heard the term 'me gusta' or 'no me gusta' in reference to discussing likes and dislikes. Maybe you've even said it yourself when you really liked something or when you really didn't like something. It's important to know why we use 'me gusta' instead of 'yo gusto,' or 'te gusta' instead of 'tu gustas,' as well as how to use 'nos gusta' and 'le gusta' and how to negate these phrases! Below are some examples using me, le, te, and nos.

Examples of Discussing Likes and Dislikes

Me gusta la fresa - I like the strawberry
Me gustan las fresas - I like the strawberries
No me gustan las frutas - I don't like fruits
Yo no me gusta la fresa - I don't like the strawberry

A ella le gusta la casa- She likes the house
Le gustan las casas - She likes the houses
No le gusta la casa - She doesn't like the house
A ella no le gustan las casas - She doesn't like the houses

¿Te gusta el libro? - Do you like the book?
¿Te gustan los libros? - Do you like the books?
¿No te gusta leer? - You don't like to read?
¿A ti no te gusta el libro? - You don't like the book?
¿María, no te gustan los libros? - María, you don't like the books?

Nos gusta la película - We like the movie
Nos gustan las películas - We like the movies
No nos gusta mirar películas - We don't like to watch movies
No nos gustan las películas - We don't like movies

After reviewing the above examples, check out this link for more about gustar and other verbs like it.

We appreciate you taking a moment to read over this blog and watch the video above. Please submit any Spanish related questions you have in the comments below, and be sure to check out the other free resources on our site. ¡Muchas gracias!

The Spanish Simple Future Tense

Spanish Simple Future Tense

If you're unsure of what the Spanish simple future tense is, we call it the 'cheating' method of expressing future tense verbs. For example, you use ir (to go) much the same as we say that we're going to do something in English, such as yo voy a comer (I'm going to eat) or tú vas a nadar (You're going to swim).

Examples of Spanish Simple Future Tense

Yo voy a hablar - I am going to speak
Tú vas a hablar - You are going to speak
Él/Ella/Usted va a hablar -- He/She/You are going to speak
Nosotros vamos a hablar - We are going to speak
Vosotros vais a hablar - You all are going to speak
Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes van a hablar - They/You all are going to speak

Yo voy a comer - I am going to eat
Tú vas a comer - You are going to eat
Él/Ella/Usted va a comer - He/She/You are going to eat
Nosotros vamos a comer - We are going to eat
Vosotros vais a comer - You all are going to eat
Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes van a comer - They/You all are going to eat

Yo voy a vivir - I am going to live
Tú vas a vivir - You are going to live
Él/Ella/Usted va a vivr - He/She/You are going to live
Nosotros vamos a vivir - We are going to live
Vosotros vais a vivir - You all are going to live
Ellos/Ellas/Ustedes van a vivir - They/You all are going to live

After studying the examples above, you can find a link to 100 of the most common Spanish verbs here.

Another link for more tips and free resources for learning Spanish can be found here.

T
hank you so much for watching the video and reading the blog. Feel free to submit your own Spanish related questions by clicking the Contact button at the top of this page. 









 

 

 

Translate »